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By Meghan Wanucha Smith, Coordinator of Instructional Assessment, East Carolina University, wanucham16@ecu.edu

This post is based on a poster presented at 2018 Library Assessment Conference.

Background

Photo of Meghan Wanucha
Meghan Wanucha

At East Carolina University’s Joyner Library, librarians and library staff in Research & Instructional Services teach information literacy instruction for classes ranging from introductory composition to graduate-level research methods and use a variety of assessment techniques to gauge student learning. In previous program assessment efforts, we focused on lower-level composition classes with quizzes to test students’ abilities to use specific library resources. This time around, we wanted to know what students were learning in all of our classes to get a better sense of what the process of learning looked like in the entire instruction program. Could we design an easy-to-implement, shared assessment that would capture this information?

...continue reading "Shared Outcomes, Shared Practice: Evaluating an Instruction Program with One Assessment Technique (Guest Post)"

Today's post is from a team of educators at Florida State College at Jacksonville. Sheri Brown, Marilyn Painter, and Susan Slavicz work as a cross-division team to understand students' perceptions of plagiarism and to address their needs through education and training. They presented this research at the Georgia International Conference on Information Literacy in September 2018.

By Sheri Brown, Librarian; Marilyn Painter, Professor of English; and Susan Slavicz, Director, Academy of Teaching and Learning
Florida State College at Jacksonville

The plagiarism bug just can’t seem to be eradicated. It is an issue that faces all institutions. At Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ) English faculty joined with faculty librarians to collaborate on an assessment to combat student fallacies regarding plagiarism.

Photo of the authors
Sheri Brown, Librarian; Marilyn Painter, Professor of English; and Susan Slavicz, Director, Academy of Teaching and Learning at Florida State College at Jacksonville

...continue reading "Guest Post: Plagiarism – Assessment – Collaboration"

Photo illustration of creativity and ideasAt the Georgia International Conference on Information Literacy I had an opportunity to talk with several faculty members in writing and composition. Not surprisingly, many of these professionals have interests that align with those of librarians, not least in the area of information literacy. In fact, the Georgia conference regularly brings together educators from across the disciplinary spectrum who use this opportunity to develop shared understandings, to solidify common goals, and to listen and learn from each other.

I decided to explore the work going on at the intersection of writing studies and information literacy and I was not disappointed. So much impressive work is happening! Below are some key resources in this area.

Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing
Developed by the Council of Writing Program Administrators, the National Council of Teachers of English, and the National Writing Project
Published in 2011 this Framework document caught my attention in part because of my familiarity with the ACRL Framework. Once I read the executive summary and full document, though, I got really excited. The focus on how teachers can foster certain habits of mind that the authors deem “essential for success in college writing” is an approach that resonates with librarians working to foster information literacy dispositions through training transfer.

...continue reading "InfoLit and Writing Programs: A Match Made in the Classroom"

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Jane Liu, Associate Professor of Chemistry, Pomona College

Dr. Jane Liu is a founding member of the Advisory Board of the Threshold Achievement Test for Information Literacy. She is a faculty member in the Chemistry Department at Pomona College and she incorporates elements of information literacy in her teaching.

Jane, we are so pleased to have you on the Advisory Board for the Threshold Achievement Test for Information Literacy. You bring a valuable perspective to our work, particularly as a faculty member in the sciences. Please tell us about your position as Associate Professor of Chemistry at Pomona College.

Jane: I have a fantastic job!  I was hired to primarily teach biochemistry, which I describe as understanding how cells and organisms work, at a molecular level. I teach this subject in the classroom, mostly to third- and fourth-year undergraduates, but I’m a firm believer that some of the best ways to learn science is to actually do science. So I also engage students in my research lab where I investigate how genes are turned on and off in bacteria. My students and I work side by side, wearing lab coats and gloves, growing bacteria, isolating DNA, RNA and proteins, and doing experiments on these materials to answer questions that we do not know the answer to. There is a great deal of learning that can occur when tackling the unknown – and there are always a few unexpected surprises that are uncovered.

...continue reading "Meet the TATIL Advisory Board: Jane Liu"

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Liz Kavanaugh, Information Literacy and Assessment Librarian at Misericordia University

Liz Kavanaugh is a founding member of the Advisory Board of the Threshold Achievement Test for Information Literacy. A long-time user of the Project SAILS information literacy assessment tool and an advocate for effective assessment, Liz was the perfect match for the fledgling project to create a new tool based on the ACRL Framework.

In this interview, you will see how Liz's commitment to assessment and to information literacy are woven throughout her professional life.

Question: What do you like about your job?

Liz: I am very fortunate to be in the position of Information Literacy and Assessment Librarian at Misericordia University in Dallas, Pennsylvania. When I took the position about five years ago, we were just heading into an accreditation year with Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE). It was an exciting time that launched me right into the thick of gathering data, writing reports, and meeting with stakeholders across campus. I really loved the active sense of how important assessment was at that time and I love how it has grown into a more full-fledged body of data today for the library. Much of it is based on the information brought forward through our long-term use of SAILS at this time and now we’re on the route to our 2024 review, which brings the excitement full circle.

Q: Please tell us about a project you are currently working on. What are you trying to accomplish? ...continue reading "Meet the TATIL Advisory Board: Liz Kavanaugh"