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By request of the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force we are posting their announcement:

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) invites you to attend one of their free online open forums to learn more about the work of their task force appointed to oversee substantial revisions to the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education that will be completed by June 2014. The Information Literacy Standards for Higher Education, first adopted in 2000, have defined information literacy for librarians, educators, and assessment agencies. The task force is working on a new approach that underscores the critical need for faculty members and librarians to collaborate to effectively address information literacy education that aligns with disciplinary content. While the exact approach is still under discussion, two new elements will be incorporated: threshold concepts and metaliteracy. These two foundational elements should provide the basis for more sustained collaborations with disciplinary faculty and create more aligned teaching and learning communities at the institutional level.

During the online open forum you will learn about the direction the task force is taking with the revisions, the composition of the group, and opportunities for you to provide feedback or ask questions about the process. Due to limited space we ask you to attend as a group under one registration. We encourage you to include stakeholders from across campus including but not limited to librarians, faculty, provosts, academic support services, general education curriculum committees, and members of accrediting agencies.

There is no charge to participate in an online open forum and each lasts one hour. Online open forums will be held:

• Thursday, October 17, 10am Pacific/11am Mountain/noon Central/1pm Eastern

• Tuesday, October 29, 8am Pacific/9am Mountain/10am Central/11am Eastern

• Monday, November 4, 10am Pacific/11am Mountain/noon Central/1pm Eastern

Sign up is limited to 300 logins for each event, first-come first-served. Register now! Links to the recorded online open forums will be posted afterwards on the website.

This month, we dedicate ourselves to increasing information literacy awareness so that all citizens understand its vital importance. An informed and educated citizenry is essential to the functioning of our modern democratic society, and I encourage educational and community institutions across the country to help Americans find and evaluate the information they seek, in all its forms.

                                                                                    President Barack Obama, October 1, 2009

In two days, it will be Information Literacy Month – how will you celebrate? Some libraries use this as an opportunity to reinforce the message of information literacy via their communication channels. Others seek to engage their communities through activities and events. Wherever you are, the team at Project SAILS hopes you will find some time this month to take stock of your information literacy accomplishments. Have a party, or a conversation with colleagues, or simply reflect and smile. Be proud of your profession and your contributions to education and information literacy.

Project SAILS (Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills) is launching the beta test of an international version of the SAILS cohort assessment.

We are very excited to reach this stage. Working with librarians from various countries, we have made extensive revisions to the assessment so as to meet the needs of an international audience. In order to determine if the new test is valid, we are seeking testing institutions in countries outside the United States. If you or someone you know is interested, please go to this web page for details:

http://beta.projectsails.org/betatest

There is no cost to participate. We are asking you to commit to getting 100 students as test-takers. If you have at least 50 students take the test, you will receive a report about their performance as a group.

Please let us know if you have any questions. We can be reached at info@projectsails.org

Thanks!

A new report from the Pew Internet and American Life Project tells us that digital technologies are encouraging teenage students to write more creatively and to write more often. The study of middle and high school teachers focuses on the teachers’ perceptions of how student writing is affected by the Internet, search engines, social media, cell phones, and texting (what they call “digital technologies”).

The researchers found that teachers see these technologies as:

“generally facilitating teens’ personal expression and creativity, broadening the audience for their written material, and encouraging teens to write more often in more formats than may have been the case in prior generations.  At the same time, they describe the unique challenges of teaching writing in the digital age, including the “creep” of informal style into formal writing assignments and the need to better educate students about issues such as plagiarism and fair use.”

This report is the third in a series of three studies on middle and high school teachers:

How Teens Do Research in the Digital World (November 2012)

How Teachers Are Using Technology at Home and in Their Classrooms (February 2013)

The Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing and How Writing is Taught in Schools (July 2013)

I find these reports fascinating and informative. They fascinate me because they offer glimpses into a world (secondary education) I know little about but that directly affects my work as an information literacy librarian at a university. The reports are informative about both my future students and, I suspect, my current students, assuming that the ways that high school students and college students use digital technologies are more similar than different. The reports generate a fistful of ideas for follow-up: How would professors at my university answer the questions posed to teachers in the most current study? Are the students at my school similar in key demographics to the study sample? Do the people running the Writing Center on my campus read these reports? Do the findings resonate with them? Should we collaborate to build on the positives and address the concerns from the findings?

 

 

 

 

 

I recently attended a great presentation by April Cunningham and Hal Hannon on college reading and library instruction. It was part of the 3rd Annual Summer Retreat for Librarians, held at Chapman University in Orange, CA.

April and Hal link Carol Kuhlthau’s work on information search process with what we know about college students’ struggles to learn from academic texts, including scholarly journal articles. They developed or adapted three informative and thought-provoking models as a result. One illustrates the reading cycle during the reading process. Another is titled “Your Research Pathway,” and is designed to show students how to think about the steps of their project based on where they are in the information search process. The third model is another worksheet for students, this time focusing on unpacking academic texts in the sciences/social sciences and the humanities.

April and Hal have a web site with their presentation and models: http://cunninghamhannon.wordpress.com. It's well worth a look.